Cratering

A half-stack doesn't fit in the trunk.

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Cratering

a half-stack doesn't fit in the trunk
The aforementioned lamps. 

The aforementioned lamps. 

I was going through some old files (I’m kind of a pack rat in that sense) and discovered the schematic above. For those of you who’ve seen The Good at any point since about 1996—and shame on those of you who haven’t—you’ve surely noted the four floorstanding houselamps we have on stage. They’re the kind of thing your grandma had in her house in the 70’s. We drilled holes out in the lampshades so they spell out G-O-O-D. See what we did there?
We’d been touring with them for a while, I think, when the idea struck me that it’d be fun to animate the lights, to set them up to blink rather than just be on all the time. There were various professional lighting devices available at the time that would have met the requirements and more, but we were already in debt and barely clawing out with our gig money. It was cheaper to build than to buy. So I designed and built this digital controller circuit for under $150. That’s it in the second picture. The control circuit is in the leftmost junction box, and the second one has solid state relays to control the 120V lamp circuits. It’s all screwed to a 2x6. There is also a remote footswitch to turn the lights on/off, and to initiate the blinking sequence.
Here’s what struck me as I looked at the yellowing schematic: I have been building technology, first as a hobbyist and then professionally, since I was about twelve years old. None of the software I built for a living (not counting my current “job”) is running anywhere. I don’t think that’s so much a referendum on the quality of my work—just life in a corner of the financial services world where ideas don’t work forever, so by definition neither will your software. And all the audio gadgets I’ve built over the years are in landfills. Most couldn’t handle life on the road, or were inferior to commercial products that are also cheaper.
But this stupid thing—after years of rough treatment traveling the country, being stomped on, having beer spilled on it, being chucked into trailers at 2:00am—is still running strong since 1996. Other than a couple of failed receptacles which you can see are disabled by duct tape, this has never required maintenance. This is by far my most enduring engineering work.
Zoom Info
I was going through some old files (I’m kind of a pack rat in that sense) and discovered the schematic above. For those of you who’ve seen The Good at any point since about 1996—and shame on those of you who haven’t—you’ve surely noted the four floorstanding houselamps we have on stage. They’re the kind of thing your grandma had in her house in the 70’s. We drilled holes out in the lampshades so they spell out G-O-O-D. See what we did there?
We’d been touring with them for a while, I think, when the idea struck me that it’d be fun to animate the lights, to set them up to blink rather than just be on all the time. There were various professional lighting devices available at the time that would have met the requirements and more, but we were already in debt and barely clawing out with our gig money. It was cheaper to build than to buy. So I designed and built this digital controller circuit for under $150. That’s it in the second picture. The control circuit is in the leftmost junction box, and the second one has solid state relays to control the 120V lamp circuits. It’s all screwed to a 2x6. There is also a remote footswitch to turn the lights on/off, and to initiate the blinking sequence.
Here’s what struck me as I looked at the yellowing schematic: I have been building technology, first as a hobbyist and then professionally, since I was about twelve years old. None of the software I built for a living (not counting my current “job”) is running anywhere. I don’t think that’s so much a referendum on the quality of my work—just life in a corner of the financial services world where ideas don’t work forever, so by definition neither will your software. And all the audio gadgets I’ve built over the years are in landfills. Most couldn’t handle life on the road, or were inferior to commercial products that are also cheaper.
But this stupid thing—after years of rough treatment traveling the country, being stomped on, having beer spilled on it, being chucked into trailers at 2:00am—is still running strong since 1996. Other than a couple of failed receptacles which you can see are disabled by duct tape, this has never required maintenance. This is by far my most enduring engineering work.
Zoom Info

I was going through some old files (I’m kind of a pack rat in that sense) and discovered the schematic above. For those of you who’ve seen The Good at any point since about 1996—and shame on those of you who haven’t—you’ve surely noted the four floorstanding houselamps we have on stage. They’re the kind of thing your grandma had in her house in the 70’s. We drilled holes out in the lampshades so they spell out G-O-O-D. See what we did there?

We’d been touring with them for a while, I think, when the idea struck me that it’d be fun to animate the lights, to set them up to blink rather than just be on all the time. There were various professional lighting devices available at the time that would have met the requirements and more, but we were already in debt and barely clawing out with our gig money. It was cheaper to build than to buy. So I designed and built this digital controller circuit for under $150. That’s it in the second picture. The control circuit is in the leftmost junction box, and the second one has solid state relays to control the 120V lamp circuits. It’s all screwed to a 2x6. There is also a remote footswitch to turn the lights on/off, and to initiate the blinking sequence.

Here’s what struck me as I looked at the yellowing schematic: I have been building technology, first as a hobbyist and then professionally, since I was about twelve years old. None of the software I built for a living (not counting my current “job”) is running anywhere. I don’t think that’s so much a referendum on the quality of my work—just life in a corner of the financial services world where ideas don’t work forever, so by definition neither will your software. And all the audio gadgets I’ve built over the years are in landfills. Most couldn’t handle life on the road, or were inferior to commercial products that are also cheaper.

But this stupid thing—after years of rough treatment traveling the country, being stomped on, having beer spilled on it, being chucked into trailers at 2:00am—is still running strong since 1996. Other than a couple of failed receptacles which you can see are disabled by duct tape, this has never required maintenance. This is by far my most enduring engineering work.

I know, it’s terrible. 

Here, where we develop future capitalists from the womb onward, the baseball teams are named after the companies that sponsor them. Those companies pick the graphics. It’s an advertising opportunity and a life lesson. 

Our sponsor is Legacy Auto Works, and their logo is a giant L. That’s fine, though someone should have thought through what that giant L means in a sporting context before putting it on their shirts. 

At least they didn’t put a gigantic C on the jerseys. That is the mark of true baseball futility around here.

I know, it’s terrible.

Here, where we develop future capitalists from the womb onward, the baseball teams are named after the companies that sponsor them. Those companies pick the graphics. It’s an advertising opportunity and a life lesson.

Our sponsor is Legacy Auto Works, and their logo is a giant L. That’s fine, though someone should have thought through what that giant L means in a sporting context before putting it on their shirts.

At least they didn’t put a gigantic C on the jerseys. That is the mark of true baseball futility around here.

Spring may actually be here.

Spring may actually be here.

It’s elemental

H: The last dozen years of my life have been in some part defined by a decent chunk of friends in my demographic cohort suffering sudden, complete failures of their meat suits. Too soon.

He: Hiding behind process is the lowest form of cowardice. Get shit done or get the fuck out the way. And shut up while you’re at it.

Li: I remember being 25 and knowing everything. No idea why I wasn’t bludgeoned. Maybe the 40-somethings in charge remembered their own stupid youth and took some pity? Maybe I should emulate those guys now?

Be: I’m not as angry as that all seems. I’m on my way home in 66° weather. Tonight there will be wine, good company, and music to soothe. And it’s an old person place with seats.

B: The next two weeks are big, busy, and bold. I embrace change; always have. I thrive on volatility. But even by my standards, these are big waves building. Surf’s up.

northwesternu:

Seth Meyers! Stephen Colbert! Read about the Wildcat domination of late night network comedy television: http://bit.ly/1ef1q3Q #wildcatseverywhere

I know some people are disappointed in the Colbert choice for various reasons—some of which I agree with—but I’m super proud of my alma mater.

northwesternu:

Seth Meyers! Stephen Colbert! Read about the Wildcat domination of late night network comedy television: http://bit.ly/1ef1q3Q #wildcatseverywhere

I know some people are disappointed in the Colbert choice for various reasons—some of which I agree with—but I’m super proud of my alma mater.

underwhelmed:

Having to work when it’s the first 70 degree day in Chicago after the long horrible winter

That.
Also? Just this job.

underwhelmed:

Having to work when it’s the first 70 degree day in Chicago after the long horrible winter

That.

Also? Just this job.

Do you listen to Steely Dan?
-- Anonymous

I do.

Was it the bandana that gave it away?

Vintage GPOY, about 1992.

Back row, 3rd from the right.

Ladies.

Vintage GPOY, about 1992.

Back row, 3rd from the right.

Ladies.

Indigo Girls - Kid Fears
(10 plays)

Kid Fears // Indigo Girls

Grownupping sucks.

Are you on fire from the years?
What would you give for your kid fears?

Get here soon, tumblr savior for iOS.

Tuesday in my head

Oftentimes when I’m alone in a contained crowd—on this train, in a bar, at the store—I game out what would happen if the group of strangers I was with at that moment were somehow suddenly, permanently isolated together. Say, transported via a wormhole, or maybe the only survivors of an instant cataclysm. In a flash, we are the last people on the planet, and we have to decide how (or if) we are going to survive together. What kind of leadership structure would emerge? Who’d be in charge? Anyone here know how to raise food or hunt? Who’s going to be my friend? Who might kill me for sport? What about a possible mate? Anyone know medicine? Who looks like they know how to weld, or repair masonry? Am I a burden or an asset here?

That’s how I brain.

goestoeleven:

davesnothere:

fictionandneuroscience:

jewlesthemagnificent:

donrickles:

laughterkey:

fieldnotesfromabroad:

dougieplaysbanjo:

pinkprincess17:

whatshewanted:

be strong.
(i was already kind, and good, and smart. i had to learn to be strong.)

Let go

fucking idiot

Breathe. Think.

You can.

Pretentious dick.

Shut Up.

SLOW DOWN. 

Do It.

Worry less.

Quit coasting.

goestoeleven:

davesnothere:

fictionandneuroscience:

jewlesthemagnificent:

donrickles:

laughterkey:

fieldnotesfromabroad:

dougieplaysbanjo:

pinkprincess17:

whatshewanted:

be strong.

(i was already kind, and good, and smart. i had to learn to be strong.)

Let go

fucking idiot

Breathe. Think.

You can.

Pretentious dick.

Shut Up.

SLOW DOWN. 

Do It.

Worry less.

Quit coasting.

Asia - Only Time Will Tell
(148 plays)

Only Time Will Tell // Asia

whatever. shut up. i’m in a place.

The Essence of Sunday

Number of difficult conversations I expect to have tomorrow: 2 or 3.

Number of hours of sleep I expect to get tonight: 2 or 3.