Cratering

A half-stack doesn't fit in the trunk.

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Cratering

a half-stack doesn't fit in the trunk

do-over:

thekidshouldseethis:

Observing a six month old baby girl orangutan, an eight year old son and their mother as they spend family time together in the Sumatran jungle in Indonesia. From the cameraman for this Earth-Touch video: 

“Our interaction with the mother via our close observation of her behaviour is more cognitive than anything I have experienced with another animal. It is rather startling to look into her eyes and see her looking back with the same self-awareness and awareness of another.”

A great ape that we share 96.4% of our genetic makeup with, there are two species of Orangutans: Bornean and Sumatran. The Sumatran Orangutan is one of the world’s 25 most endangered primates. They have lost 80% of their habitat in the last 20 years. 

In the Malay language, Orang means “person” and hutan means “forest” — people of the forest

Wait for it ……

This is moving and wonderful, yet somehow it made me sad, too.

Sad that we’ve just about wiped them out and surely will finish the job soon, sad that so few people think that matters, sad that still others would deny that we so OBVIOUSLY share common characteristics with these creatures and that it’s likely explained by our common ancestry.

(Source: thekidshouldseethis)

Grandpa turned 98 today; Grandma turned 94 in June. Though they have a few challenges, they still live without assistance and basically kick all kinds of ass. Grandma made the amazing cake we are about to devour, for example. 

Really hoping I inherited longevity genes from that side of the family. 

Happy birthday, Grandpa.

Grandpa turned 98 today; Grandma turned 94 in June. Though they have a few challenges, they still live without assistance and basically kick all kinds of ass. Grandma made the amazing cake we are about to devour, for example.

Really hoping I inherited longevity genes from that side of the family.

Happy birthday, Grandpa.

Going home today

A successful vacation, indeed, for all of them but me. I had fun but was sadly unable to disconnect myself completely from work. Big, bad things happened in my area, and while others covered ably for me, I am walking back into a buzz saw tomorrow (really, starting this afternoon). What a helpless feeling, to watch it all unfold via email and a couple of phone calls. I’ve got a real mess on my hands, both technologically and in terms of credibility. “Where the fuck were you when we needed you last week, asshole?” I was drunk by a pool in Wisconsin, thanks for asking.

Still, everyone else had a great time and so I’ll chalk this up as a major success. I was going to write up a thing with my observations here, but it was too Seinfeld-y (“what’s the deal with frozen margaritas?”) and lame. Cancel editing this post? All changes will be lost. OK.

I do have one question I need answered, and it’s about the ubiquitous teen romance going on here. I could imagine the locals buying a day pass to the water park and hanging out in there, doing their makeout thing like they do and then going home. I saw enough of that and it makes sense; I’d have done it if I had an equivalent place at that age. What I don’t get is all the teen love up here in the hotel hallways of the resort. Lots of hand-holding, lap-sitting, tongue-tasting going on up here. How is that happening? Is it just the most magical of coincidences that the families of our young lovers schedule their vacations together? Is it romance borne of convenience between kids of families that are old friends? I thought maybe there are some school or church trips, but there wasn’t enough other evidence of that, like giant groups of teens in matching uniform shirts and frazzled chaperones scheduling their fun. What gives?

One other memory will be the emerging comic skills of my son. He’s figured out that making people laugh is a serious rush. He’s also getting better at it. He writes jokes now, and they’re as hit-or-miss as you might expect from a six-year-old. But he slayed us yesterday with this one:

How can you tell when a squirrel has to pee?
He’s holding his nuts.

I know, not quite Lewis Black, and maybe you had to be there and share half his DNA, but it killed. 

Last night, two brother and sister duets: one behind the piano and another underneath.

Last night, two brother and sister duets: one behind the piano and another underneath.

Remembering Gerald Scholvin

My uncle Jerry died on New Year’s night, peacefully, in his sleep. He was 76.

To say Jerry faced challenges throughout his life doesn’t begin to describe it. At the age of four he was hit by a truck, suffering severe injuries to his pelvis and legs. Given the medical technology available at the time, it’s remarkable he survived at all. The state of rehabilitation practices was also primitive in 1938; he basically had to teach himself to walk again just a couple of years after learning for the first time. 

I tend to believe that Jerry’s self-rehab at such an early age set the stage for a lifetime of dogged independence. Some time after college he decided, quite reasonably, that he’d had enough of Chicago winters, and so he moved to Los Angeles and later Phoenix. Even though he still had some mobility challenges as an adult, he disregarded the advice he was receiving to stay close to home to get help if he needed it. He didn’t think he needed any help, thank you very much.

Jerry was a true die hard when it came to his love of the White Sox and the Bears. When he got older, he moved back to Chicago and inexplicably chose to live on the far north side, in Rogers Park, deep in Cubs territory. I asked him why once, and he said, “because by being the only Sox fan up here, I’m automatically the smartest guy on the block.” No argument.

During the last few years of his life, I was the family member who lived closest to him, and so I got to know him a little better. He wasn’t around a lot when I was a kid, and, honestly, my dad’s family isn’t knit all that tightly. I’d stop by and we’d talk baseball and football and politics. He was a fierce, passionate liberal. We couldn’t talk college basketball, though, since for some bizarre reason he was a Duke fan.

Jerry’s health wasn’t great for the last few years. He had a couple of terrible infections in his legs, some coronary issues, other problems. He lived in a couple of places that were, frankly, less than awesome. It wasn’t a pretty picture, in the aggregate. And even though he had much he might complain about, he never did. Not one time. Every time I asked him how it was going, he said it was great. Enthusiastically. And then he’d ask about my wife and kids, how work was going, what I thought of that asshole Palin. Enough about me. Tell me about you. My dad told me he was that way his whole life.

My sister and my aunt went up there to gather his things the other day, and they found something remarkable: a collection of letters, dating back years, that Jerry’s friends had written him. He’d saved every one. Friends he’d made along the way at various stops around the country and here at home, just writing to check in. These were old school letters, hand written, the kind you take extra time to do, to think out and get right the first time without the benefit of the backspace key. We’re contacting the people who wrote those letters to inform them of his passing, and to let them know that we’ll be having a memorial service this spring to celebrate his life. He hated winter, and would have appreciated that we’re waiting.

Safe travels, Uncle Jerry. The kid you used to call “Tiger” loves you and will miss you.

Gerald “Jerry” Scholvin, 30-Dec-1934 — 1-Jan-2011, is survived by his brother Ken (Dyanne), brother Charlie (Jean), sister Joan (Victoria), four nieces and nephews, four great-nieces and great-nephews.

My sister and I at some awful Wrigleyville bar after the NU/Illini game yesterday.
The place was jammed; she’d been there for a while and I was faced with a 50+ person line to get in. She told the bouncer some story about how I was going back to my home in Europe tomorrow and would it be OK if I jumped the line? He bought it and let me in, though I think he’d buy whatever she was selling.
She also bought me beer to cheer me up after her school trashed mine. Best sister ever, right there.

My sister and I at some awful Wrigleyville bar after the NU/Illini game yesterday.

The place was jammed; she’d been there for a while and I was faced with a 50+ person line to get in. She told the bouncer some story about how I was going back to my home in Europe tomorrow and would it be OK if I jumped the line? He bought it and let me in, though I think he’d buy whatever she was selling.

She also bought me beer to cheer me up after her school trashed mine. Best sister ever, right there.

I mentioned a while back that we were having a 70th anniversary party for my grandparents. The party was yesterday. Lots of great times reconnecting with cousins from far away, retelling old stories, and remembering those who aren’t with us.
But of course the guests of honor, Al and Adele McCormick, were the center of it all. They were obviously having a great time. My grandmother’s pre-party protesting of all this “fuss” was the smokescreen we knew it was. She was glowing. Grandpa was in excellent form, too, holding court and telling stories. Didn’t matter that we’ve all heard them before.
My aunt made this life-sized cardboard cutout of a photo from their wedding day. We couldn’t resist getting a “then and now” shot.
70 years together. Try wrapping your head around it.

I mentioned a while back that we were having a 70th anniversary party for my grandparents. The party was yesterday. Lots of great times reconnecting with cousins from far away, retelling old stories, and remembering those who aren’t with us.

But of course the guests of honor, Al and Adele McCormick, were the center of it all. They were obviously having a great time. My grandmother’s pre-party protesting of all this “fuss” was the smokescreen we knew it was. She was glowing. Grandpa was in excellent form, too, holding court and telling stories. Didn’t matter that we’ve all heard them before.

My aunt made this life-sized cardboard cutout of a photo from their wedding day. We couldn’t resist getting a “then and now” shot.

70 years together. Try wrapping your head around it.